The Chronicle

We reviewed her Preludes And Fugues the other week and it was delightful, the pianist interpreting various piano pieces for their spiritual side.

This companion CD is less ethereal in feel, more of the concert hall than the cathedral, the closing section from Debussy aside.

In the (again, very clear) sleeve notes, she writes she has played these pieces at various stages of her life, and the practising, playing and research has left her with a mental image of what the pieces are about.

The opening piece is Beethoven (Piano Sonata in E minor op90) and while Andreeva doesn’t give away what image she has in her head, she mentions love in the sleeve notes. There is gentleness in places, though it’s the formal love of a young beau at a ball.

There follows Scriabin’s Piano Sonata No10 Op70, also known as the “trill” or “insect” sonata, as Scriabin set it (according to Russian lore) in a forest. The piece is evocative of a verdant forest and insects (and birds) fluttering about.

Prokofiev’s Piano Sonata No2 in D minor Op14 takes the technical playing up a level, and generates the longest analysis from Andreeva, a very atmospheric section. The closing Debussy pieces are added as bonus tracks and make for a relaxing close.

Both this and Preludes And Fugues are superb as far as the playing goes. We prefer the gentler Preludes for its Goldberg Variations feel, while this CD is more formal. But they are both outstanding.

—Jeremy Condliffe