The Sunday Times

The trombonist Barrie Webb, who instigated this collaboration with seven Japanese composers, deserves congratulation. One might think the trombone to be an unpromising solo instrument but, as Luciano Berio and Vinko Globokar have famously shown, it is capable of a huge range of tone colours and articulations, encouraging vastly different approaches. Each piece here – whether it’s Takashi Fujii’s jazzy Dancing Bones; Sociological Japan, Masato Kouchi’s ironic take on his country’s national anthem; Katsuji Maeda’s prayer-like Intermezzo; Hiroshi Nakamura’s Klee-inspired Angelus Novus; Tatsuya Hirano’s meditative Alone; Kunihiko Goto’s Inquisition/cloister; or Katsumi Yokoyama’s Traces II, inspired by, of all things, a tome on cognitive psychology – is uniquely satisfying in its own way. The trombonist Barrie Webb, who instigated this collaboration with seven Japanese composers, deserves congratulation. One might think the trombone to be an unpromising solo instrument but, as Luciano Berio and Vinko Globokar have famously shown, it is capable of a huge range of tone colours and articulations, encouraging vastly different approaches. Each piece here – whether it’s Takashi Fujii’s jazzy Dancing Bones; Sociological Japan, Masato Kouchi’s ironic take on his country’s national anthem; Katsuji Maeda’s prayer-like Intermezzo; Hiroshi Nakamura’s Klee-inspired Angelus Novus; Tatsuya Hirano’s meditative Alone; Kunihiko Goto’s Inquisition/cloister; or Katsumi Yokoyama’s Traces II, inspired by, of all things, a tome on cognitive psychology – is uniquely satisfying in its own way.
*** (outstanding)

—Stephen Pettitt